What is a  safety file?

What is a safety file?

What is a  safety file?

A  Safety File, otherwise known as a ‘Contractor Health and Safety File’ is a record of information focusing on the management of health and safety on construction sites for contractors and sub-contractors. It protects the employer from criminal liability and proves compliance to the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations.

What does the South African LAW say about a Health and Safety File?

Every contractor and sub-contractor is required by the Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 and the Construction Regulations 2014, to have a  Safety File that must be available at all times. The Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 and Construction Regulations 2014 state the following:

Construction Regulation 3(6)– A client must ensure that the principle contractor keeps a copy of the construction work permit contemplated in sub regulation (1) in the occupational health and safety file for inspection by an inspector, the client, the client’s authorized agent, or an employee;
Construction Regulation 5(1)(s) – The client must ensure that health and safety file contemplated in regulation 7(1)(b) is kept and maintained by the principle contractor;
Construction Regulation 7(1)(b) –A principle contractor must open and keep on site a health and safety file which must include all documentation required in terms of the Act and these Regulations, which must be made available on request to an inspector, the client, the client’s agent or a contractor.
The Health and Safety File must be maintained by the site safety personnel and audited by a competent person.

What do we include in your  Safety File

Every  Safety File is ‘site specific’. It will be compiled in accordance with the client’s and the site’s safety specifications. The overall information requirements remain the same, and the site specific documents will be added. When we setup your Health and Safety File, it will consist of the following Documents:

  • Contractor appointment letter. (Construction Regulation 5(3)(f) of the OHS A)
    37(2) Agreement between client and contractor
  • Notification of Construction Work
  • Copy of the OHS Act
  • Occupational Health and Safety Management Plan
  • Company Occupational Health and Safety Policy
  • Letter of Good Standing
  • Material Safety Data Sheets for hazardous materials used (if required)
  • Tax clearance certificate
  • Risk Assessments
  • Safe work procedures (Site Specific)
  • Fall Protection plan (if required)
  • Legal appointment with proof of training (Ex. Chief Executive Officer, Risk Assessor, First Aider etc.)
  • Incident reporting procedures
  • Incident reports (General Administrative Regulation 9 (3) – Annexure 1)
  • Incident registers
  • Reports of accidents
  • Emergency preparedness documents
  • First aid documents
  • Induction records
  • Medical surveillance records
  • Safety communication (e.g. Toolbox talks)
  • Minutes of safety meetings
  • Inspection registers
  • Read more on our blog
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When do I need a safety file?

When do I need a safety file?

When is a safety file required and what must the contractor know?

Every contractor and sub-contractor is required by the Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 and the Construction Regulations 2014, to have a  Safety File that must be available at all times. The Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 and Construction Regulations 2014 state the following:

  • Construction Regulation 3(6)– A client must ensure that the principle contractor keeps a copy of the construction work permit contemplated in sub regulation (1)  in the occupational health and safety file for inspection by an inspector, the client, the client’s authorized agent, or an employee;
  • Construction Regulation 5(1)(s) – The client must ensure that health and safety file contemplated  in regulation 7(1)(b) is kept and maintained by the principle contractor;
  • Construction Regulation 7(1)(b) –A principle contractor must open and keep on site a health and safety file which must include all documentation required in terms of the Act and these Regulations, which must be made available on request to an inspector, the client, the client’s agent or a contractor.

There is no prescribed format for a safety file in the OHS Act,Construction Regulation 7(1)(b) –A principle contractor must open and keep on site a health and safety file which must include all documentation required in terms of the Act and these Regulations.However the client or clients agent may prescribe an standard or format in the clients health

SACPCMP
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Conrisk
Safety File Software VS Consultants

Safety File Software VS Consultants

Can I use software to compile a safety file for my project?

Yes you can. However the OHS Act,85 of 1993 under Construction Regulation 7(1)(a) and (b) requires the contractor to submit a site specific health and safety plan and a safety file for each project.So many companies sell software to contractors, who does not have the required skills and knowledge to compile a safety file.

There is different software available but all the material is generic and will not be specific to the site or the task.This software is generally cheap and once you bought it , you need to spend hours trying to understand the instructions.

What makes the SACPCMP registered consultants better ?

Any consultant  registered with the SACPCMP has been assessed and found competent, with the necessary skills and experience. The consultant has been professionally registered and must abide by the SACPCMP code of conduct.
On the larger projects it is an legal requirement to appoint a SACPCMP individual.

Will you go to a heart surgeon who is not HPCSA registered?

Rad more on our blog

Safety Files
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Stephan Van Der Westhuizen